Here’s The Hymn Player’s Favorite Chord

You arrived at this page because you’re interested in learning about the hymn player’s favorite chord.

One of the aspects of church musicianship is hymn playing, and every gospel musician must take it seriously because hymns are an integral part of the church service.

In this lesson , you’ll find out one of the chords that are commonly found in hymn songs that has come to become the hymn player’s favorite.

The Hymn Player’s Favorite Chord

The hymn player’s favorite chord is the chromatic supertonic chord.

Due to the fact that so many people reading this blog are not familiar with certain scholarly terms, I’ll break down the chromatic supertonic chord.

Chromatic. The term chromatic literally means colorful and is used to describe a musical idea that is foreign to a given key.

Supertonic. The term supertonic is the technical name of the second degree of the scale.

The chromatic supertonic chord is a chromatic chord established on the second degree of the scale.

There are a wide spectrum of chromatic supertonic chords, however, we’re focusing on the hymn player’s favorite, which is commonly used as a passing chord to the chord of the fifth degree.

“Check It Out…”

In the key of C major:

…the D major triad:

…is the hymn player’s favorite chord, which usually precedes the chord of the fifth degree (which is the G major triad in this case):

It’s also common to hear sophisticated chord classes like seventh and extended chords instead of the major triad.

For example, the D major triad:

…can be upgraded to the D dominant seventh chord:

…and other extended chords like the D dominant ninth chord:

…and the D dominant thirteenth (sharp eleventh):

The hymn player’s favorite chord can be heard in several hymn songs like Blessed Assurance, I Need Thee Every Hour, O Come O Ye Faithful, Tis So Sweet, Amazing Grace, etc.

Example #1 – “Tis So Sweet”

Take him:

…at his:

…word:

Example #2 – “I Need Thee Every Hour”

Can:

…pe-e-eace a-:

…fford:

“The Hymn Player’s Favorite Chord In All Twelve Keys…”

In the key of C major:

…the hymn player’s  favorite chord is the D major triad:

…the D dominant seventh chord, and the D dominant ninth chord:

In the key of Db major:

…the hymn player’s  favorite chord is the Eb major triad:

…the Eb dominant seventh chord, and the Eb dominant ninth chord:

In the key of D major:

…the hymn player’s  favorite chord is the E major triad:

…the E dominant seventh chord, and the E dominant ninth chord:

In the key of Eb major:

…the hymn player’s  favorite chord is the F major triad:

…the F dominant seventh chord, and the F dominant ninth chord:

In the key of E major:

…the hymn player’s  favorite chord is the F# major triad:

…the F# dominant seventh chord, and the F# dominant ninth chord:

In the key of F major:

…the hymn player’s  favorite chord is the G major triad:

…the G dominant seventh chord, and the G dominant ninth chord:

In the key of Gb major:

…the hymn player’s  favorite chord is the Ab major triad:

…the Ab dominant seventh chord, and the Ab dominant ninth chord:

In the key of G major:

…the hymn player’s  favorite chord is the A major triad:

…the A dominant seventh chord, and the A dominant ninth chord:

In the key of Ab major:

…the hymn player’s  favorite chord is the Bb major triad:

…the Bb dominant seventh chord, and the Bb dominant ninth chord:

In the key of A major:

…the hymn player’s  favorite chord is the B major triad:

…the B dominant seventh chord, and the B dominant ninth chord:

In the key of Bb major:

…the hymn player’s  favorite chord is the C major triad:

…the C dominant seventh chord, and the C dominant ninth chord:

In the key of B major:

…the hymn player’s  favorite chord is the C# major triad:

…the C# dominant seventh chord, and the C# dominant ninth chord:

Final Words

I’m pretty certain that you’ve learned about the chromatic supertonic chord, and how it can be played in all twelve keys.

We’ll explore other chromatic supertonic chords in subsequent lessons.

See you then!

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Chuku Onyemachi

Hello, I'm Chuku Onyemachi (aka - "Dr. Pokey") - a musicologist, pianist, author, clinician and Nigerian. I started teaching musicians in my neighbourhood in April 2005. Today, I'm humbled to work as a music consultant with HearandPlay Music Group for musicians in Africa and beyond.

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