Hymn Breakdown: All Hail The Power Of Jesus Name (For Advanced Players)

In today’s lesson, we’ll be breaking down the hymn All Hail The Power Of Jesus Name.

This breakdown is dedicated to students at the pre-advanced and advanced level, who are interested in enriching their chordal vocabulary.

This breakdown would be done in the key of F major:

F is the first tone

G is the second tone

A is the third tone

Bb is the fourth tone

C is the fifth tone

D is the sixth tone

E is the seventh tone

F is the eighth tone

Attention: It’s recommended for you to focus on, and learn all the chords and chord progressions used in this hymn breakdown. You may not necessarily play the hymn with all the chords given in the breakdown.

A Short Note On Hymns

Believe it or not, hymns are an integral part of christian worship because there are hymns for every season (Christmas, Easter, and so on), time of the day (morning, noon, night, and so on), message (repentance, forgiveness, and so on), etc.

Hymn songs have a way of creating a worship atmosphere when they are sung and given the proper interpretation and this is because of the liturgical nature of its form, melody, harmony, and rhythm.

An Overview Of The Hymn

Here are the words to the hymn:

1. All hail the power of Jesus’ name!
Let angels prostrate fall;
bring forth the royal diadem,
and crown him Lord of all.
Bring forth the royal diadem,
and crown him Lord of all.

2. Ye chosen seed of Israel’s race,
ye ransomed from the fall,
hail him who saves you by his grace,
and crown him Lord of all.
Hail him who saves you by his grace,
and crown him Lord of all.

3. Sinners, whose love can ne’er forget
the wormwood and the gall,
go spread your trophies at his feet,
and crown him Lord of all.
Go spread your trophies at his feet,
and crown him Lord of all.

4. Let every kindred, every tribe
on this terrestrial ball,
to him all majesty ascribe,
and crown him Lord of all.
To him all majesty ascribe,
and crown him Lord of all.

5. Crown him, ye martyrs of your God,
who from his altar call;
extol the Stem of Jesse’s Rod,
and crown him Lord of all.
Extol the Stem of Jesse’s Rod,
and crown him Lord of all.

6. O that with yonder sacred throng
we at his feet may fall!
We’ll join the everlasting song,
and crown him Lord of all.
We’ll join the everlasting song,
and crown him Lord of all.

A Simple Analysis Of The Melody

The melody of the song in the key of F major:

…starts on the fifth tone of the scale (which is C):

…and ends on the first tone of the scale (which is F):

The range of the melody is from C (which is the lowest pitch in the melody):

…to D (which is the highest pitch in the melody):

A Breakdown Of The Hymn

In this breakdown, we’re basically reharmonizing the melody of the hymn song using altered and extended chords, lots of chromatic chord progressions, and cyclical chord progressions as well.

“Here Are A Few Tips On The Elements Used…”

Altered chords are formed when the ninth and/or fifth tone of an extended dominant chord is raised or lowered by a half step.

Extended chords are chords that exceed the compass of an octave. Ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords are extended chords.

Chromatic chord progressions are chord progressions where chords that are foreign to the prevalent key are used. For example, using chords from the key of B major in a chord progression in C major produces a chromatic chord progression.

Cyclical chord progressions are chord progressions where the movement of the root notes is based on a stipulated interval. In this case, root movement is in fifth intervals.

The Reharmonization Of The Hymn

One of the things top players do while playing hymns is reharmonization, which is basically an unconventional approach to the harmonization of melody notes.

So, in this breakdown, the conventional approach to harmonization is replaced with tons of advanced chord voicings that you can enrich your chordal vocabulary with.

Attention: It is important for you to pay attention to the chord progressions formed, so that you can understand how they are formed and how you can apply them in other songs.

Check out the reharmonization of the hymn All hail The Power Of Jesus Name:

That was very advanced, I must confess. So, let’s go into the breakdown of the chords and chord progressions used in this lesson.

A Breakdown Of The Reharmonization

One of the goals of this lesson is to show you how the melody of the hymn All Hail The Power Of Jesus Name can be reharmonized.

However, beyond the reharmonization of the hymn, every serious pianist and musician should be able to pick up tons of chords and chord progressions from this breakdown.

Chromatic Chord Progressions

Throughout the breakdown, you can see tons of chromatic chords used in the formation of chromatic chord progressions. However, here are notable ones highlighted for you.

“Check Them Out…”

#1. A 6-2-5-1 chord progression to chord 1:

#2. A 2-5-1 chord progression to chord 1:

#3. A 3-6-2-5-1 chord progression to chord 6:

#4. A 6-2-5-1 chord progression to chord 6:

#5. A 2-5-1 chord progression to chord 6:

Cyclical Chord Progressions

Cyclical progressions in fourths/fifths were also used at the beginning:

…and at the part that says “bring forth the royal diadem”:

Classical Movements

There are also some classical piano movements and they are noteworthy.

Excerpt #1:
Excerpt #2:

Series Of 2-5 Chord Progressions

At the end of the hymn, 2-5 chord progressions were played repeatedly – three times in a row:
Here’s the first one:
…the second:
…and the third:

Final Words

Congratulations! Getting to the end of this lesson let’s me know that you’re serious about taking your hymn playing to the next level with altered chords, extended chords, chromatic chord progressions, and lots more.

I’ll see you in the next hymn breakdown, until then, kindly transpose the concept learned to other keys.

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Chuku Onyemachi

Hello, I'm Chuku Onyemachi (aka - "Dr. Pokey") - a musicologist, pianist, author, clinician and Nigerian. I started teaching musicians in my neighbourhood in April 2005. Today, I'm humbled to work as a music consultant with HearandPlay Music Group for musicians in Africa and beyond.

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