Who Else Is Interested In Learning Passing Chords To Minor Chords?

There are passing chord types that are designed to precede minor chords in chord progressions and we’ll be learning a few of them like:

  • The dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord
  • The dominant seventh [flat ninth, sharp fifth] chord
  • The dominant seventh [sharp ninth, sharp fifth] chord
  • The dominant seventh [flat ninth, flat fifth] chord

Let’s get started.

Dominant Seventh [Flat Ninth] Chord

Although we covered this chord type earlier as a passing chord to major chords, it can be used as a passing chord to minor chords. Here’s a classic example: the C dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

“Analysis Of The Voicing…”

The dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord can be voiced by playing a diminished seventh chord a whole step below a given root note.

The F# dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord can be voiced by playing a diminished seventh chord that is a whole step below the root note (F#):

….(which is the E diminished seventh chord):

The E diminished seventh chord:

…over F# (on the bass):

…produces the F# dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

“Application Of The Dominant Seventh [Flat Ninth] Chord…”

The dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord can easily be applied as a passing chord to a minor chord that is a fourth above (or a fifth below) its root.

The B dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

…can be applied as a passing chord to a minor chord that’s a fourth above (or a fifth below) its root.

A fifth below B:

…is E:

Therefore, the B dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

…can be applied as a passing chord to E minor chords like the E minor triad:

…E minor seventh chord:

…E minor ninth chord:

…etc.

“Check Out All The Dominant Seventh [Flat Ninth] Chords On The Keyboard…”

C dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

Db dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

D dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

Eb dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

E dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

F dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

F# dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

G dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

Ab dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

A dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

Bb dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

B dominant seventh [flat ninth] chord:

Dominant Seventh [Flat Ninth, Sharp Fifth] Chord

Here’s another essential passing chord that precedes minor chords in chord progressions: the dominant seventh [flat ninth, sharp fifth] chord.

A classic example of the dominant seventh [flat ninth, sharp fifth] chord is the C dominant seventh [flat ninth, sharp fifth] chord:

…which can be voiced using the Bb half-diminished seventh chord:

Playing the Bb half-diminished seventh chord:

…over C (on the bass):

…produces the C dominant seventh [flat ninth, sharp fifth] chord:

“Analysis Of The Voicing…”

The dominant seventh [flat ninth, sharp fifth] chord can be voiced by playing a half-diminished seventh chord a whole step below a given root note.

For example, the Eb dominant seventh [flat ninth, sharp fifth] chord can be voiced by playing a half-diminished seventh chord that’s a whole step below the root (Eb):

….(which is the C# half-diminished seventh chord):

The C# half-diminished seventh chord:

…over Eb (on the bass):

…produces the Eb dominant seventh [flat ninth, sharp fifth] chord:

“Application Of The Dominant Seventh [Flat Ninth, Sharp Fifth] Chord…”

The dominant seventh [flat ninth, sharp fifth] chord can be used as a passing chord to a minor chord that is a fourth above (or fifth below) its root. For example, the G dominant seventh [flat ninth, sharp fifth] chord:

…can be used as a passing chord to a minor chord that’s a fifth below its root. A fifth below G:

…is C:

Consequently, the G dominant seventh [flat ninth, sharp fifth] chord:

…resolves to any C minor chord, which may include any of the following:

C minor triad:

C minor seventh:

C minor ninth:

Following the same procedure, any dominant seventh [flat ninth, sharp fifth] chord can be applied.

Dominant Seventh [Sharp Ninth, Sharp Fifth] Chord

The dominant seventh [sharp ninth, sharp fifth] chord is arguably the most preferred passing chord type that precedes minor chords.

A classic example of the dominant seventh [sharp ninth, sharp fifth] chord is the C dominant seventh [sharp ninth, sharp fifth] chord:

…which can be voiced using the Bb seventh [suspended fourth, suspended sharp fourth] chord:

Playing the Bb seventh [suspended fourth, suspended sharp fourth] chord:

…over C (on the bass):

…produces the C dominant seventh [sharp ninth, sharp fifth] chord:

“Analysis Of The Voicing…”

The dominant seventh [sharp ninth, sharp fifth] chord can be voiced by playing a seventh [suspended fourth, suspended sharp fourth] chord a whole step below a given root note.

For example, the G# dominant thirteenth [sharp eleventh] chord can be voiced by playing a seventh [suspended fourth, suspended sharp fourth] chord that’s a whole step below the root (G#):

….(which is the F# seventh [suspended fourth, suspended sharp fourth] chord):

The F# seventh [suspended fourth, suspended sharp fourth] chord:

…over G# (on the bass):

…produces the G# dominant seventh [sharp ninth, sharp fifth] chord:

“Application Of The Dominant Seventh [Sharp Ninth, Sharp Fifth] Chord…”

The dominant seventh [flat ninth, sharp fifth] chord can be used as a passing chord to a minor chord that is a fourth above (or fifth below) its root. For example, the D dominant seventh [sharp ninth, sharp fifth] chord:

…can be used as a passing chord to a minor chord that’s a fourth above its root. A fourth above D:

…is G:

Consequently, the D dominant seventh [sharp ninth, sharp fifth] chord:

…resolves to any G minor chord, which may include any of the following:

G minor triad:

G minor seventh:

G minor ninth:

Following the same procedure, any dominant seventh [sharp ninth, sharp fifth] chord can be applied.

Dominant Seventh [Flat Ninth, Flat Fifth] Chord

The list of essential passing chords is not complete without the dominant seventh [flat ninth, flat fifth] chord.

A classic example of the dominant seventh [flat ninth, sharp fifth] chord is the C dominant seventh [flat ninth, flat fifth] chord:

…which can be voiced using the Gb dominant seventh chord (in second inversion):

Playing the Gb dominant seventh chord:

…over C (on the bass):

…produces the C dominant seventh [flat ninth, flat fifth] chord:

“Analysis Of The Voicing…”

The dominant seventh [flat ninth, flat fifth] chord can be voiced by playing a dominant seventh chord a tritone below a given root note.

For example, the B dominant seventh [flat ninth, flat fifth] chord can be voiced by playing a dominant seventh chord that’s a tritone below the root (B):

….(which is the F dominant seventh chord):

The F dominant seventh chord (in second inversion):

…over B (on the bass):

…produces the B dominant seventh [flat ninth, flat fifth] chord:

“Application Of The Dominant Seventh [Flat Ninth, Flat Fifth] Chord…”

The dominant seventh [flat ninth, flat fifth] chord can be used as a passing chord to a minor chord that is a fourth above (or fifth below) its root. For example, the G# dominant seventh [flat ninth, flat fifth] chord:

…can be used as a passing chord to a minor chord that’s a fifth below its root. A fifth below G#:

…is C#:

Consequently, the G# dominant seventh [flat ninth, flat fifth] chord:

…resolves to any C# minor chord, which may include any of the following:

C# minor triad:

C# minor seventh:

C# minor ninth:

Following the same procedure, any dominant seventh [flat ninth, flat fifth] chord can be applied.

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Chuku Onyemachi

Hello, I'm Chuku Onyemachi (aka - "Dr. Pokey") - a musicologist, pianist, author, clinician and Nigerian. I started teaching musicians in my neighbourhood in April 2005. Today, I'm humbled to work as a music consultant with HearandPlay Music Group for musicians in Africa and beyond.